renew

renew, restore, refresh, renovate, refurbish, rejuvenate are comparable when they mean to give a person or thing that has become old, worn, or exhausted the qualities or appearance of what is fresh or new or young.
Renew is so inclusive a term that it may imply a making something new to replace the old that has died, decayed, or disintegrated
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each spring the trees renew their foliage

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I think I will be extravagant enough to renew my entire wardrobe— Shaw

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or a remaking so that it seems like new of a thing which has depleted its vitality or force or has lost its freshness
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they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength— Isa 40:31

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to renew and rebuild civilization, and save the world from suicide—7.5. Eliot

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or a making a fresh start
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renewed his efforts

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renewed his offer of assistance

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Restore (see also RESTORE 2) definitely implies a return to an original state or to a prime condition typically after depletion, exhaustion, or illness
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restored his vigor

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restored his good humor

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a long rest restored him to health

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or after being marred, injured, or wrecked (as by passage of time, use, accident, or assault in war)
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Rheims Cathedral was restored after World War I

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an attempt to restore a picture

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or after the loss of a vital or essential quality or character
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if I quench thee, thou flaming minister, I can again thy former light restore, should I repent me— Shak.

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Refresh often implies the supplying of something necessary to restore lost strength, animation, or power
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sleep refreshes both body and mind

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a cool, refreshing drink

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or to make up for what has been lost through forgetfulness or disuse
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he made it his business to see Dr. Lavendar, and be refreshed as to facts— De land

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Equally often the term implies the imparting of freshness to something by or as if by cooling, wetting, or allaying thirst; it then usually connotes an enlivening, invigorating, or exhilarating effect
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the springs . . . under the earth . . . break forth to refresh and gladden the life of flowers and the life of man— Binyon

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it refreshes me to find a woman so charmingly direct— Bromfield

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Renovate and refurbish differ from the preceding terms chiefly in being referred almost exclusively to material things and as a consequence in not having the poetic connotations so often found in renew, restore, and refresh.
Renovate is often used in place of renew when cleansing, repairing, or rebuilding is implied
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renovate an old colonial house

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drawn into a sequence of violent episodes that cause him to renovate his attitudes toward life and death— Martin Levin

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while refurbish implies the restoration of newness or freshness by or as if by scouring or polishing and suggests here little more than a freshening up of the appearance or the external aspects of a thing
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refurbish an old table by sandpapering and waxing it

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and therefore occasionally is used in depreciation
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hoped to reform national conduct ... by reforming our vocabulary .... But it does seem a good bit to achieve with nothing more tangible than a refurbished vocabulary— Laird

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the refurbishing of trite thoughts is the sole accomplishment of many would- be poets

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Rejuvenate implies a restoration of youthful vigor, powers, appearance, or activities; sometimes it merely suggests a giving a youthful aspect to something old
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he . . . had the air of an old bachelor trying to rejuvenate himself— Irving

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outworn themes may be rejuvenated by taking on contemporary garb— Lowes

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Analogous words: *mend, repair, rebuild: reform, revise, rectify, *correct
Contrasted words: exhaust, *deplete, drain, impoverish, bankrupt

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • renew — re‧new [rɪˈnjuː ǁ rɪˈnuː] verb 1. [intransitive, transitive] to arrange for an existing contract, agreement, deal etc to continue: • Most airlines renew their insurance policies between July and October. • The original contract had a term of… …   Financial and business terms

  • renew — re·new /ri nü, nyü/ vt 1: to make like new: restore to freshness, vigor, or perfection; specif: to prevent the lapse of (a judgment) due to expiration of a statute of limitations 2: to do or state again renew ed his objection to the evidence 3:… …   Law dictionary

  • renew — [ri no͞o′, rinyo͞o′] vt. [ME renewen < re + newe (see NEW), after L renovare: see RENOVATE] 1. to make new or as if new again; make young, fresh, or strong again; bring back into good condition 2. to give new spiritual strength to 3. to cause… …   English World dictionary

  • Renew — Re*new (r? n? ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reneved} ( n?d ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Renewing}.] [Pref. re + new. Cf. {Renovate}.] 1. To make new again; to restore to freshness, perfection, or vigor; to give new life to; to rejuvenate; to re[eum]stablish; to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • renew — late 14c., from re again + M.E. newen resume, revive, renew; on analogy of L. renovare …   Etymology dictionary

  • Renew — Re*new , v. i. To become new, or as new; to grow or begin again. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • renew — [v] start over; refurbish begin again, brace, breathe new life into*, bring up to date*, continue, exhilarate, extend, fix up, freshen, gentrify, go over, mend, modernize, overhaul, prolong, reaffirm, reawaken, recommence, recondition, recreate,… …   New thesaurus

  • renew — ► VERB 1) resume or re establish after an interruption. 2) give fresh life or strength to. 3) extend the period of validity of (a licence, subscription, or contract). 4) replace or restore (something broken or worn out). DERIVATIVES renewal noun… …   English terms dictionary

  • renew */*/ — UK [rɪˈnjuː] / US [rɪˈnu] verb [transitive] Word forms renew : present tense I/you/we/they renew he/she/it renews present participle renewing past tense renewed past participle renewed 1) to arrange for something to continue for a longer period… …   English dictionary

  • renew — Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to make like new ; restore to freshness, vigor, or perfection < as we renew our strength in sleep > 2. to make new spiritually ; regenerate 3. a. to restore to existence ; revive b. to make …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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